Why So Serious?







I like fun music that makes me feel better rather than worse; music that makes me happier rather than sadder; music that makes me want to dance rather than sit and sulk. Sad music has it’s place every once in a while. But most of the time I want happy stuff. I think that that’s why I listen to so much electro– it’s a fun genre. Nobody singing about romances gone awry or rapping about the poverty problem in Detroit. Nothing but interesting sounds, funky basslines and glitchy drumbeats.







So if the listeners are having fun, the music makers must be having a good time, too, right? Err, sometimes. You can tell there are some musicians (electronic and otherwise) who don’t enjoy making music. It’s evident in the way they interview or how they act on stage. It’s usually the more famous musicians who seem unhappy. So maybe it’s not that these people don’t enjoy creating/performing music per se. They’re probably just annoyed with all that music industry bullshit– distribution deals and royalty/management fees and suit-and-tie executives flashing calculated orders about what to do/say/think. Being a famous musician is fiscally fantastic but creatively frustrating: there are a lot of people depending on you/your music. You’ll probably feel pressure to do certain things. You’ll sometimes feel like you’ve lost sight of whatever it was that drove you to make music in the first place.







But I really can’t sympathize. Because if you’re making money by making music, you’re pretty damn lucky. So enjoy it. Or at least pretend like you do. So stop taking everything so seriously and have a good time. There are about a million people who would trade places with you in a heartbeat. You’re living the dream. Act like it.




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Baxen – Freya

It Takes a Woman

I‘m not really sure which nodes are the aching ones, but what I do know is that the notion of a female IDM producer makes my nodes ache.

Everyone is a dude. This world is all dudes. And inside this world of dudes, there exists a population of hipster DJ’s that, unfortunately, is comprised of an even larger percentage of dudes. But here’s the cool part: If you wade through all the muscle and propecia in that Dj population, you’ll manage to find a meager 3% of them that don’t have penises, and that somehow makes them interesting. Do they offer anything different? No. Well, that is besides anatomy. Are they potentially even less qualified than their male counterparts? Maybe, maybe not. All I know is that they’ve got a draw to them, and these are just the DJ’s; Inside that already very tiny nest of a population, there exists an even smaller portion of women who actually produce music. And inside that population, there are a few–just a few–who produce good music, and they, my friends, are the women who are to die for.

Tokimonsta is one of those women. Nuff said.

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TOKiMONSTA – Aching Nodes

What’s a Remix?

You know what’s weird about remixes these days? Ten years ago, everyone took a completely different approach to the art. It used to be about taking a finished tune with a good hook, and looping, reworking, extending, and modifying that hook to make it work in a club. Or perhaps it was about modifying a bass line, or slightly altering the key to catch people off guard in a club setting. This is no longer the case.

In the last several years, as inspired by the enormous influx of young and motivated producers, remixing has become an entirely new art form, in which one uses a few elements of an original track (beat, vocal, synth line, etc.) as the basis for an entirely new track, complete with it’s own hooks, beats, and musical thoughts, and this has left what used to be considered a “remix” looking like nothing more than a meager edit.

Have a listen to remixes by artists like SebastiAn, or Seriusmo; Half the time you can’t even make out the original track. How is it considered a remix? At this point I’ve got no idea, but what I do know is that these so called remixes seem to be converting original tracks into some serious inspiration, because the things coming out, well, they’re damn good.

Have a listen to these two versions of Etienne de Crecy’s “Hope”, and see what you think.

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Etienne de Cr̩cy РHope

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Etienne De Crecy – Hope (Djedjotronic Remix)