What’s Happening to Our Producers?

I can’t say I’m not a little frustrated. The normal process by which I write a majority of my updates seems to have fallen through; In the past, my time was very rarely spent actively searching for new tunes to cover. In fact, the case was actually quite the opposite, in that most of the music I choose to share has found it’s way to me, simply due to the tendency of high quality music to spread rather easily through our tightly linked disco districts. Recently however, I’ve been lucky to encounter a track or two that I can even bring myself to listen to, much less love. Maybe it has something to do with this supposed “recession” we’re in. Maybe the contracting money supply is also contracting the creative pool of the many producers that most of us rely on to keep our spirits lifted. And yes, I can see how one might point out that my guess makes little sense, but how else should I account for the drastic change in the quality of music output? Seriously, check this out:

Two of my favorite artists of all time are Daft Punk and (to a somewhat lesser extent, due to their having not been around for quite as long) Crookers. Both artists have managed to put out works that far exceed the standard, to the point that they’ve created miniature revolutions within their respective niches, and both have done it on more than just a few occasions. After listening to their latest, however, I’ve found myself stumped (not to mention nearly brought to tears) as I wonder whether either will make a recovery from the extremely questionable tunes they’ve released.

Crookers

Crookers have always kept their style plain and simple. Their clean beats are well cut, and feature an exceedingly minimalist nature, but despite this, they’ve always managed to keep their tracks progressive enough that upon reaching the end, one feels as though he or she has been taken through the song, and not simply exposed to a couple of bland beats for three minutes. Their remix of Isa Gt’s “Pela O”, however, turns their reputation upside down. Literally none of what’s mentioned above is present in this track. In fact, with random loops that simply repeat and alternate back and forth providing the sole bit of substance for the track, it’s hard to find anything interesting at all.

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Isa Gt – Pela O (Crookers Remix)

Daft Punk

As much as I hate to say it, I think the Daft Punk track I’m about to include is even more of a failure. I’m actually banking on the off chance that perhaps some lonely bedroom producer discovered how to recreate the Rollin’ and Scratchin’ synth line, and then proceeded to use the Daft Punk name to promote his mix, because I find it incredibly difficult to accept the fact the both Guy Manuel de Homem Christo and Thomas Bangalter would find this take on Franz Ferdinand’s Take Me Out suitable to release.

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Franz Ferdinand – Take Me Out (Daft Punk Remix)

Please children… work your magic. Make me feel better.

Edit: I can’t explain to you how relieved I am to have discovered that this “Daft Punk remix” is, in fact, a counterfeit. As such, in an attempt to halt the spread of an undeserving bedroom producer’s pilfered track, I’ve removed the download link. The stream, however, will remain up for some time, in order to make an example of this unfortunate experience.

She can teach you a thing or two!

It’s been a while since an incredibly well done disco track has been matched with an equally amusing video. I think it’s safe to say that a large portion of the time, lyrics and poetic meaning in house and electro music are (assuming they even exist) just so flat out awful that putting the time into making any kind of video would do nothing but shorten the artist’s life by means of wasted time (Honestly, no offense to the guy, but look at the original video for Benny Benasi‘s Satisfaction. If either of them are an attempt to appeal to any of the normal human emotions, I’m clueless as to what that might be). This being the case, we find ourselves part of a world where a video itself is a rarity; a video of quality is essentially nothing more than a myth.

Bodyrox

Taking the above into consideration, I’m sure you’ll see my reasoning in choosing not to waste a single moment in assisting this slinky little visual, courtesy of London’s Bodyrox, in corrupting our youthful eyes. Experience tells me it’s sure to get you feeling a little hot…

And since the sound of frenzied girls telling you to “push it in and pull it back” is likely to be cemented into your mind so quite some time (and because mp3’s tend to act in a similar fashion to morphine for many of us disco addicts) , it’s generally recommended that you grab a copy of this track to support your habbit and quench the cravings. I’ve included both the original, as well as a D Ramirez extended dub for those of you who like to see kids sweat.

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Bodyrox – Yeah Yeah

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Bodyrox – Yeah Yeah (D Ramirez Vocal Club Mix)

It’s About Time We Start Rubbing Our Tummies Again

I realize the Lemur‘s probably going to egg my home for saying this, but I feel I owe you all the deepest of apologies for having nearly disappeared from the blogging world for more than a week! *Cringe* Now, I could go on and spend a bit of time assuring both myself and the disco starved kids around here that my excuse is within reason, however, I feel that it makes more logical sense to simply satisfy the collectively lustful hunger for audio that I’m sure we’re all likely experiencing, as soon as possible. (My excuse would have been lame anyway) As such, I’m proud to present to you, without further ado, Roger… Seventytwo!

Rogerseventytwo

So I realize I’ve I’ve been doing quite a bit of genre classification recently, and I’m not entirely too proud of it. Genre’s tend to be based more off of the mathematical side of music (how many beats in a bar, different repetition styles, etc.), and it’s only thanks to my rediscovery of this particularly festive Rogerseventytwo track that I’ve been able to regain control over my mind, so that I might return to appreciating and grouping songs based on the way they make me feel, and not the title that iTunes assigns them.

You might ask why it was this particular track that jarred me back into reality, and I could definitely spend some time answering that question if I wanted to. I could mention the sparks that flew the first time it came on. I could mention the peak hour, euphoric feeling that only a certain few tracks have ever allowed me to feel. I could mention how it was instantly categorized in the holy archives of my mind among the likes of Daft Punk‘s One More Time, and Voodoo Chili‘s I Need, as one of those triumphant, blissfully sustained cries of joy where no matter how many times you’ve heard the same 4 second loop, you’re always disappointed when the track winds to a close. But in this case, I don’t think there’s any better way to experience the wonder that our humble little Dutch friend has fabricated than first hand. I would, however, recommend that a buddy agrees to keep an eye on you before you let this little kicker do it’s thing. You’re going to want someone to find you when you get lost in your head.

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DJ DLG – Paramount (Rogerseventytwo Remix)

We’re All Moving, But I’m Not Sure Anyone Knows Where We’re Going

It’s strange seeing my so called electro world being split so readily in two like this. It seems the heavy electro sounds that brought the dance community so close together a few years back have progressed in such diverse ways that we’re no longer able to uniformly agree on what defines the most desirable new sound, and as such, we’ve been left with two entirely different genres of music that are both somehow still grasping to be considered electro. I suppose it is a bit strange, and almost a bit frustrating to think that there are going to be multiple tastes and preferences to satisfy along our future disco endeavors, but let me assure you, this can only be good: This may, in fact, require that a little effort be put back into the “job” that is Dj’ing, and as such, I feel there could be a massive drop in the number of freeloading blog abusers sometime in the very, very near future. The threat of required effort, my friends, is natural selection at its best. (That is, if natural selection were real, of course. But the earth is only 6000 years old, remember? Sarah Palin told us so.)

The Two Branches of Electro

That title made me feel like I’m writing a history book. Maybe I should make an outline due at the end of the quarter.

Anyhow, it seems the first half of the split electro genre has not only skimmed the fat, but it’s actually dumped a good 75% of its musical meal right out the window without losing a single bit of integrity. It’s like this: Rather than being served a burrito with everything that makes your taste buds get freaky, all crammed into one delicious dish, you’re now receiving a single bomb ass steak, and a baked potato. In the end you’ve only got about 10% of what you had before, but somehow it’s just way better. And steering away from this failed food analogy, I’d go so far as to say this musical sect could more easily be defined under minimal than under electro, although my opinion is likely to beg a rebuttal.

Bass Kleph

I suppose artists like DeadMau5 and his latest BSOD, The Royal Rumble, and even Herve (especially alongside Sinden), have all veered more toward this side of the argument more than the other, however, the audio craftsmanship of Australia’s Bass Kleph brings it all home. Presenting to you: The epitome of blip-tastic bounce.

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Twocker – Stitch (Bass Kleph Remix)

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Stupid Fresh – Get The Fuck Up (Bass Kleph Remix)

Part Two

As for the other side of our post apocalyptic electro world, well, that’s where I think all the Treasure Fingers, Twelves, Dangers, Van She Tech‘s and DatA‘s of our time fit in. They’re the guys who’ve taken the exact opposite approach to their furthering of electro, and have chosen to cram every last bit of harmonic Daft Punk influence into an already brimming sound, in order to create tunes that are nearly impossible to fully comprehend. In fact, I’d go so far as to say I don’t think I’ve ever heard the same song twice. (Figuratively speaking of course).

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Big Gipp – Hot (Treasure Fingers Remix)

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Rapture – House Of Jealous Lovers (Tenderlions Remix)

I’m Not Gonna Teach Him How to Dance With You!

I think the way us disco fans listen to music has changed considerably over the last couple years. Maybe I’m just stuck in some weird state of mind where everything always seems as though it was better “back in the day”, but I feel like in a certain sense, we’ve all gradually lost part of our ability to truly appreciate music for what it’s worth. Now before you get all up in arms about my blasphemy, let me explain.

Due to its increasingly powerful capability to make our musical transactions instantaneous, the internet has allowed us to wreak havoc on our own musical tastes, and I’d be lying if I were to say I didn’t see it coming. In the early nineties, the net was all about buying the cd’s that you used to have to hike down to the local record store for, and after experiencing this ultimate convenience, we all began to look for even more potential spontaneity. Naturally, we were pushed into digital music downloads, which (as far as I’m concerned) totally eradicated the need to even like a song before stuffing it onto an iPod, and finally, we arrived at what’s generally accepted to be the current way of things: a musical scene controlled almost entirely by blogs.

Now don’t get me wrong, I’m most definitely in favor of blogs (I do run one). What I’m not in favor of is the unfortunate practice that I’ve taken the liberty of titling “blog abuse”. Many people have become so accustomed to getting all of their music from a certain collection of bookmarked websites that we’ve begun to lose our concept of taste. It’s almost like Oprah, and her viewers’ weird willingness to read everything that she tells them to, and nothing else. Though a large portion of the music out there has indeed been touched by this little predicament, it seems that the electronic scene has taken the bullet right to the heart. Disco is a genre that revolves around DJ’s, and as such the people who choose to abuse the disco blogs frequently do so whilst keeping their dj sets in mind, thus creating a circle of what could be considered musical inbreeding. The result: you get themed DJ’s. Forget variety. Forget the idea that a dj should introduce you to new music, whilst keeping you comfortable by slipping in a classic every now and again. Forget being mesmerized by a dj’s unique style and direction. Say hello to a set full of everything that you already heard on Missingtoof over the last two weeks.

That’s not even the worst of it. While unsavory music collections and poor taste do indeed provoke a sour face, the hardest blow has been planted at the heart of our own ability to enjoy the music we listen to. With the rising popularity of electro and house music in recent years, we’ve seen a massive increase in the number of half-hearted wannabe dj’s, and a bit of contact with this amateur scene has allowed me to see that as these kids scour the internet for music, they don’t even look for music that they enjoy. I’ve heard things like, “Oh! This track would be great for a transition” or “I bet people would dance to this!” but I honestly can’t even remember the last time I heard anything close to, “I love the way this song makes me feel.” How can anyone be a good dj if they don’t feel an emotional connection to the beats they throw?

Indeed, music has a universal power to unite people, but that unity is largely due to the mutual feelings that each individual experiences within his own heart.

The Twelves

I’m almost shocked at how much thought a single Twelves remix provoked in me, but I’m consoled each and every time I press play, and listen to this remarkable piece of art all over again. It was clear a while back that these kids were more than just another bandwagon dj tag team, but this track honestly takes the cake. Seeing as this is the first time in months that I’ve loved a track enough to leave it on repeat (it’s been an hour now), I feel it’s safe to say that The Twelves have added an emotional touch to dance music that has almost become a rarity, and that if you’re one of the aforementioned people that has lost a personal connection with their music, that this latest track is likely enough to put you back in touch, if not provoke tears of joy. It’s always nice when music makes it hard not to smile. If you’re in need of reminder as to what emotion feels like, this track’s for you.

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Black Kids – I’m Not Gonna Teach (The Twelves Remix)